Austin Landmark Property Services

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January 2015

Address
11573 Jollyville Rd.
Austin, TX 78759

Mailing Address
PO Box 202344
Austin, TX 78720

Contact Us
Phone: 512.794.8171
Email: info@alpsmgmt.com
Website: www.alpsmgmt.com

Our Services

  • Real Estate Services to Buyers and Sellers
  • Out of State Property Management Company Referrals
  • Maintenance and Make Ready Services for our Owners and Referring Agents

Managing For YOUR Success

Rick Ebert, REALTOR®, MPM®
CEO

512.794.8171 X 217
alpsmgmt@alpsmgmt.com

Karen Ebert, REALTOR®, MPM®
COO
512.794.8171 X 215
karen@alpsmgmt.com

Mike Ebert, REALTOR®, RMP®
Director of Property Management

512.794.8171 X 211
mebert@alpsmgmt.com

Marc Witmer
REALTOR®, RMP®, MPM®
Property Manager

512.794.8171 X 222
marc@alpsmgmt.com

Pam Fite
Assistant Director of Operations
512.794.8171 X 214
pam@alpsmgmt.com

Mike Gonzales, REALTOR®
Property Manager
512.794.8171 X 218
mike@alpsmgmt.com

Shelly Longoria, REALTOR®
Property Manager
512.794.8171 X 210
shelly@alpsmgmt.com

Yvonne Dougherty, CTA
Leasing and Management Coordinator
512.794.8171 X 220
yvonne@alpsmgmt.com

Rebecca Panacci, REALTOR®
Assistant Property Manager
Accounts Coordinator

512.794.8171 X 216
rebecca@alpsmgmt.com

Jeff Ebert
Maintenance Coordinator
512.794.8171 X 224
jeff@alpsmgmt.com

Best Practices

Check Your Insurance: Events can happen - flood, extreme heat, earthquakes, fire, and more! It is important to check your insurance to obtain the best coverage possible and ensure that it is current.Review now with your insurance agent before a disaster/emergency occurs.

If An Emergency Occurs: Please be patient and avoid tying up critical phone lines and our time. Our first priority during any emergency is to handle the situation, taking any necessary measures for the safety of your property and your tenants. Then, we will contact you as soon as we are able.

The End of A Great Year for ALPS and Our Clients
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  • Austin Area Starting The New Year With Great News .
  • Austin jobless rate drops to 4%.
  • There was a high volume of new apartments built in 2014 and more scheduled for 2015. This may seem like competition for single family home owner investors but actually, the high occupancy rates and increasingly higher rents are a reflection of our healthy market. When apartment dwellers get tired of apartment living or want to upgrade, they go into the single family market. That is good for our clients.
  • Video game industry continues great growth in the metro area promising more jobs in 2015.
  • Pam Fite celebrated her 28th year with ALPS in December. Congratulations to Pam for her loyalty over the years and especially for all her contributions to the ALPS team that have helped us to Manage For Your Success.

Fair Housing and Assistance Animals
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The Federal Fair Housing Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) protect persons with physical and/or mental disabilities. These same laws prohibit discrimination against tenants with service or support animals. The courts take this seriously and it is a huge liability to refuse to rent to a qualified handicapped person with a legitimate service or support animal. Fair Housing laws are very definitive regarding service animals. There are now other terminologies such as emotional support animals, companion animals, and psychiatric service animals. This can lead to a lot of confusion and misinformation for property owners when it comes to the various support animals and rental housing.

A service animal is one individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Tasks performed can include, among other things, pulling a wheelchair, retrieving dropped items, alerting a person to a sound, reminding a person to take medication, or pressing an elevator button. The Federal Fair Housing laws are specific regarding service animals. Service animals have also been referred to as assistance or assist animals, support animals, guide animals, and hearing animals.

An emotional support animal is a companion animal that provides therapeutic benefit to an individual with a mental or psychiatric disability. The person seeking the emotional support animal must have a verifiable disability (the reason cannot just be a need for companionship). Fair Housing views these animals as a "reasonable accommodation" and a "no pets" rule does not apply.

To qualify, a person must meet the federal definition of disability and must have a note from a physician or other medical professional stating that a person has a disability and that the reasonable accommodation (here, the emotional support animal) provides benefit for the individual with the disability. The emotional support animal alleviates or mitigates some of the symptoms of the disability. Companion or emotional support animals differ from service animals because no specific training of the animal is required.

A psychiatric service dog is one that assists people with psychiatric disabilities, such as severe depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The key distinction to remember is that a psychiatric service animal trained to perform certain tasks directly related to an individual's psychiatric disability. The dog's primary role is not to provide emotional support but to assist the owner with the accomplishment of vital tasks they otherwise would not be able to perform independently.

Under the Fair Housing Acts, here are some of the rules that apply to service or support animals:

  • Any type of legitimate support or service animal is legally NOT a "pet."
  • Property owners and property managers cannot require or take additional deposits or pet deposits because of a support or service animal.
  • Property owners and/or managers can require any tenant, including the disabled, to qualify for properties based on income, rental history, and credit. They do not have to accept poor tenancy because an applicant is handicapped or has a service animal or companion animal.
  • If a tenant compromises the safety of other tenants or their property, if the animal poses a danger to other tenants, or the tenant does not qualify under the statutes, property owners and/or managers do not have to allow the tenant in their rental units.
  • Property owners and/or managers must be very careful not to apply their own standard on determining whether a companion animal is justified.
  • Depending on the classification of the disability and specific law, an animal does not necessarily have to be a dog.
  • Property owners and/or managers can ask for simple verification of the disability and the need for the animal as treatment if the disability is not obvious.

There is so much more to service or support animals than can be covered in this article and this is not meant as legal advice. If questions or problems arise, legal counsel versed in Fair Housing law should be consulted. What is important is that investors or managers who ignore or violate Fair Housing laws regarding any assistance animal are at very high risk. As your property management company, we take this subject seriously and work to follow all Fair Housing legislation and developments.

Our Associations

ALPS Associations

The material provided in this newsletter is for informational and educational purposes only. It is NOT legal advice.
Although we believe this material is accurate, we cannot guarantee that it is 100% without errors.

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